Lead_with_a_Story_podcast_cover 2Lead with a Story Podcast Series: Lessons in Leadership, one story at a time Based on interviews with 100+ executives and leaders at dozens of successful companies around the world as they learned their most important leadership lessons - sometimes the hard way. Featuring stories from executives at Procter & Gamble, Dollar General, Hewlett Packard, Kellogg's, Dun & Bradstreet, Saatchi & Saatchi, Verizon, and many more. Each episode brings you an important lesson through a single compelling story.  

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Lessons from Losing a $2.25 Billion Company

I’ve interviewed a number of people who’ve run multi-billion dollar companies. But this might be the first time I’ve interviewed someone who’s LOST a multi-billion dollar business. At the age of 26, and fresh out of Harvard Business School, Warwick Fairfax made a successful play to privatize one of the largest public media conglomerates in [read more]

The Five Voices in Your Company and How to Lead Them

If you’ve ever tried to use Myers Briggs in your organization, you know the problem with it. It’s just too complicated. Most people can’t remember which of the 16 personality types they are, or what difference it would make even if they could. My guest this week has a solution for that. Steve Cockrum is [read more]

What Are Your Leadership Blind Spots?

This week I had a chance to talk to Rich Berens, the CEO and Chief Client Fanatic of Root Inc. (seriously, the best job title I’ve ever heard), and a noted speaker on the issues of strategy and change. Rich has a new book out called What Are Your Blind Spots? Conquering the 5 Misconceptions [read more]

Leaders Have No Rules

This week I got the chance to chat with Kevin Kruse, the founder and CEO of LEADx, a company that offers a leadership development platform powered by artificial intelligence. He’s a New York Times bestselling author, host of the LEADx podcast, and he has a new book just out called Great Leaders Have No Rules, that we spent [read more]

How to give your leaders a year’s worth of decision-making experience in a single day, risk-free

Most leadership development is leadership training — you go to a class, listen to the teacher, take some notes, do a few exercises, and then you’re done. And there’s nothing wrong with that. It can work. The problem is that I think we all know that most leadership skill is learned on the job from the [read more]

Three Questions Every Leader Needs to Ask Themselves

My guest this week is executive coach, Kim Ades. She shared a memorable story about a client of hers who came to her after he’d been diagnosed with stage 4 cancer. The advice she gave him will serve all of us well, so I encourage you to listen to the interview above. At the end, [read more]

Employee to Entrepreneur

Have you ever considered quitting your corporate job and starting your own business? Most of us have thought about it a little. But not as much as Steve Glaveski has. Steve’s the CEO and Co-founder of an innovation accelerator in Melbourne, Australia, and the author of a new book called Employee to Entrepreneur: How to [read more]

My 6 Favorite Leadership Metaphors and 2 Methods to Create Your Own

When my then son Matthew came home from his first day of fifth grade, he announced, “I’m going to learn to play the euphonium!” I said, “That’s great!” Then I sheepishly added, “Uh, what’s a euphonium?” In response, he just matter-of-factly said, “It’s like a small tuba that makes higher notes.” All I had left [read more]

Long-Term Strategic Planning Doesn’t Have to Be Boring

Sometimes a long-term vision is so lofty or so aggressive it comes across as an unachievable dream, instead of a realistic vision. If that’s the case with your vision, congratulations on having such a worthy idea! But if people don’t believe your vision will ever happen, they won’t be motivated to help you deliver it. [read more]

Un-Stuffing the Stuffed Shirts

It’s lonely at the top. Or, so I’ve heard. And the reason is that senior executives are often viewed as unapproachable and impersonal. And in a military setting where officers have to send troops into deadly combat, that irreproachable stature is probably necessary. But in a business environment, it can do more harm than good. [read more]