Lead_with_a_Story_podcast_cover 2Lead with a Story Podcast Series: Lessons in Leadership, one story at a time Based on interviews with 100+ executives and leaders at dozens of successful companies around the world as they learned their most important leadership lessons - sometimes the hard way. Featuring stories from executives at Procter & Gamble, Dollar General, Hewlett Packard, Kellogg's, Dun & Bradstreet, Saatchi & Saatchi, Verizon, and many more. Each episode brings you an important lesson through a single compelling story.  

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How to give your leaders a year’s worth of decision-making experience in a single day, risk-free

Most leadership development is leadership training — you go to a class, listen to the teacher, take some notes, do a few exercises, and then you’re done. And there’s nothing wrong with that. It can work. The problem is that I think we all know that most leadership skill is learned on the job from the [read more]

Three Questions Every Leader Needs to Ask Themselves

My guest this week is executive coach, Kim Ades. She shared a memorable story about a client of hers who came to her after he’d been diagnosed with stage 4 cancer. The advice she gave him will serve all of us well, so I encourage you to listen to the interview above. At the end, [read more]

Employee to Entrepreneur

Have you ever considered quitting your corporate job and starting your own business? Most of us have thought about it a little. But not as much as Steve Glaveski has. Steve’s the CEO and Co-founder of an innovation accelerator in Melbourne, Australia, and the author of a new book called Employee to Entrepreneur: How to [read more]

My 6 Favorite Leadership Metaphors and 2 Methods to Create Your Own

When my then son Matthew came home from his first day of fifth grade, he announced, “I’m going to learn to play the euphonium!” I said, “That’s great!” Then I sheepishly added, “Uh, what’s a euphonium?” In response, he just matter-of-factly said, “It’s like a small tuba that makes higher notes.” All I had left [read more]

Long-Term Strategic Planning Doesn’t Have to Be Boring

Sometimes a long-term vision is so lofty or so aggressive it comes across as an unachievable dream, instead of a realistic vision. If that’s the case with your vision, congratulations on having such a worthy idea! But if people don’t believe your vision will ever happen, they won’t be motivated to help you deliver it. [read more]

Un-Stuffing the Stuffed Shirts

It’s lonely at the top. Or, so I’ve heard. And the reason is that senior executives are often viewed as unapproachable and impersonal. And in a military setting where officers have to send troops into deadly combat, that irreproachable stature is probably necessary. But in a business environment, it can do more harm than good. [read more]

You’re a Leader, Not a Comedian — You Can’t Get Away With That

It’s okay to be funny in the office. In fact, I think a sense of humor is critical to success in life and work. But at work, you’re a leader, not a comedian. You don’t have the same latitude as a stand-up comic on stage. And to confuse the two can be costly. To sort through the [read more]

What To Do When the Unwritten Rules Rule

Every company has two different sets of rules: the official rules written in the policy manual, and the unspoken rules that everyone actually follows. A classic example is working hours. Company guidelines might say that quitting time is five o’clock. But if everyone else works till six and looks at you funny when you leave [read more]

The Monthly Challenge: How to Solve Tough Problems and Build Collaborative Teams at the Same Time

A friend of mine we’ll call Tom was a partner at a big consulting firm. One day, he showed up at one of his client’s offices and heard this: Sorry, Tom. We’re going to have to cancel your retainer—at least for a little while.” Now, to a consultant, those are about the worst words you [read more]

Marketing 101: Lower-Tier Shouldn’t Always Mean Watered-Down

In the late 1990s, Titleist had a 75 percent market share of the golf ball market among the best golfers in the country (those with a handicap of 15 or less). But that only represented about 5 percent of golfers. It only had a 20 percent market share among the other 95 percent of golfers. [read more]